Media Archives

National Public Transit: Province puts $3.4M to expanding public transit between Edmonton, Leduc, Nisku

The provincial government announced plans Tuesday to invest millions to help expand public transit between Leduc, Nisku, Leduc County and Edmonton.

On Tuesday, the province said $3.4 million in funding to expand the “C-Line” inter-municipal bus service currently running between those communities.

The “C-Line” runs from Century Park in Edmonton, to bus stops in Nisku and Leduc, before looping back to Century Park – with a total of five trips running during morning and afternoon peak times Monday to Friday. Continue reading →

Leave a reply This entry was posted in Blog, Events, National Public Transit and tagged Edmonton, funding, public transit on April 1, 2013 by john. Edit

National Public Transit: Public Transit Users – Claim Your Tax Credit!

If you use public transit, you can claim the cost of certain public transit passes to reduce the taxes you owe.

Important information

You can claim the cost of monthly or annual passes for unlimited travel within Canada on any of the following: buses, streetcars, subways, commuter trains, or ferries. You may also be able to claim the cost of shorter duration passes and electronic payment cards in certain circumstances.

When claiming the public transit amount, keep your transit pass in case the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) asks you to verify your claim. If you do not have your passes, you can also provide your receipts, cancelled cheques, or credit card statements to support your claim. Continue reading →

Leave a reply This entry was posted in Blog, Events, National Public Transit and tagged CCRA, public transit, tax credit, transportation on March 15, 2013 by john. Edit

National Public Transit: City forecasts increased public transit usage for 2013

The City of Charlottetown, in partnership with Trius Transit, is anticipating another successful year for the transit system.

Charlottetown transit experienced growth throughout 2012 with ridership up eight per cent over 2011.

In February 2013, the Monday-to-Friday daily average was 1,291 people, which represented a 19.6 per cent increase over February 2012.

“Charlottetown transit is an affordable and environmentally friendly transportation option that we encourage citizens to take advantage of,” said Mayor Clifford Lee. “The city worked hard with Trius Transit to provide many improvements in 2012, including a more aggressive marketing plan, and it’s great to see those efforts producing such positive results.”

The city entered into a transit agreement with Trius Transit, the Town of Stratford and the Town of Cornwall in 2012 to provide regional transit services to the three municipalities.

Transit was also re-branded last year with the new T3 logo and tagline, “Take Transit Today”, which represents the three-way partnership. New signage was created, uniforms were provided to drivers and the buses were painted bright green with yellow trim.

Transit schedules have also undergone many revisions to increase frequency and availability, and passengers have reported it to be a more reliable service.

As a result of the changes, two statistical records were broken in 2012: the number of passengers using transit per day; and the number of riders per month.

“We have no reason to think those numbers won’t continue to grow as we keep making improvements to the transit and we’re able to access more routes and appeal to more passengers,” said Coun. Terry Bernard, chair of the city’s public works, street lighting and transit committee.

Source: TheGuardian

Leave a reply This entry was posted in Blog, Events, Home, National Public Transit and tagged rural public transit, transit on March 13, 2013 by john. Edit

Just wating on a public transit route…

The affordability of transit is playing a role in the growth of ridership across the US states a 2012 report by the National Conference of State Legislatures. Another key finding was that Baby Boomers, empty nesters and young professionals are also using more public transit.

In our own community we have quite a few empty nesters and we are also attracting Baby Boomers as a retirement option. Having access to public transit only increases the desirability to choose our community to retire in… thus boosting our economy. As for the young professionals, most here drive but I for one don’t and would love to see the TROUT partner with Carlow Mayo as I know others that live here have similar feelings (see TROUT’S report). The access to have some independence without having to rely on a neighbour, family or friend only enhances the quality of life.

TROUT has made some great progress over the last couple of years and we will keep striving to achieve even greater accessibility and service.

Author: Sharron Clayton

Leave a reply This entry was posted in About the Trout, Blog, Events, Home and tagged Baby Boomers, public transit, rural public transit on March 12, 2013 by john. Edit

International Public Transit: Public transportation hits 10.5B rides in 2012

Ridership on buses, subways and other modes of public transportation in the USA rose 1.5% to 10.5 billion trips last year, the highest annual total since 2008, according to a new report.

Although Superstorm Sandy and its aftermath slowed ridership on some of the nation’s largest transit systems, at least 16 systems reported record ridership numbers in 2012, says the American Public Transportation Association.

“When Sandy hit, and the snowstorm that followed it, an estimated 74 million (transit) trips were lost, and yet we still had the second-highest ridership since 1957,” said APTA president and CEO Michael Melaniphy. Continue reading →

Leave a reply This entry was posted in Blog, Events, Home, International Public Transit and tagged public transit, rural public transit, transportation on March 11, 2013 by john. Edit

Global Public Transit: As U.S. Transit Fares Increase, Europe Starts to Make It Free

http://catchthetrout.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Tramway-in-Tallinn.jpghttp://catchthetrout.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Tramway-in-Tallinn.jpg

A tramway in Tallinn, Estonia in 1996 Credit:Flickr user Felix O

Public transportation ridership may have increased in 2012, but major transit agencies across the nation have picked an odd way to celebrate. On July 1, the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA), which serves the Philadelphia region, will increase fares. Meanwhile, New York City’s Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) will, for the fourth time in five years, up its prices this weekend.

Seven time zones to the east, the Estonian capital of Tallinn has taken the opposite approach: In January, it entirely scrapped fares for city residents, although they must initially purchase a smart card. Those who live outside the city still have to pay fares. According to Reuters, the city decided a carrot in the form of free rides is the best way to deal with traffic congestion by luring drivers onto buses and trams. (A bit of stick has been applied, too, as cars are now barred from some roads and parking fees have increased.) The city government purchased 70 new buses and 15 new trams to meet the anticipated surge in demand. Three-quarters of Tallinn residents support the plan. Continue reading →

Leave a reply This entry was posted in Blog, Events, Global Public Transit, International Public Transit and tagged free public transit, public transportation, US on March 7, 2013 by john. Edit

International Public Transit: Top Eight Reasons People Give Up On Public Transit

http://catchthetrout.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/San_Francisco_Muni_107535.jpghttp://catchthetrout.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/San_Francisco_Muni_107535.jpgCommuters are more likely to stop using public transit when they experience delays they can blame on the transit agency, according to researchers at the University of California Berkeley.

They are more likely to forgive delays caused by traffic, emergencies or mechanical failures.

“The most significant negative experiences that drove a reduction in transit use were delays perceived to be the fault of the transit agency, long waits at transfer points, and being prevented from boarding due to crowding,” wrote the researchers: graduate student Andre Carrel, undergraduate Anne Halvorsen and Professor Joan L. Walker from Berkeley’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Continue reading →

Leave a reply This entry was posted in Blog, Events, Home, International Public Transit and tagged bus, International Public Transit, policy, public transit on March 7, 2013 by john. Edit

Global Public Transit: 500 new Chinese buses for Madagascar’s creaking public transport

Madagascar- Madagascar transporters have decided to import 500 new buses from China to improve the country’s public transportation, official sources said.

“The new vehicles are expected to arrive in the capital Antananarivo in June,” Mr Jocelyn Andrianambinintsoa of the Malagasy transporters union, told reporters Tuesday.

The buyers have opted for the products of the Chinese manufacturer Yutong for technical and financial reasons.

Two types of buses were proposed to the transporters: A bus containing 40 seats was negotiated for $40,000 while the one with 30 seats was purchased at $30,000.

The transporters will get the financial guarantee of the government.

An arrangement with two Madagascar’s commercial banks that are to fund the operation has been concluded, the source said.

The initiative to modernise the country’s common transport has been in the pipeline since last year.

Commuters have for long complained about the bad quality service observed across the island.

The vehicles in use are not only old but the fares charged are also considered exploitative.

In last December, President Andry Rajoelina sent to China a delegation to select any manufacturers they wanted to cooperate with.

Last month, representatives of three Chinese vehicle constructors such as Yutong, Hengtong and Higer met with their eventual clients in Antananarivo.

The plan to buy the big number of buses from China is like a mini-revolution for the nation land transportation.

Historical records show similar initiative dates back to the 1980s.

The then-government encouraged importation of hundreds of Japanese buses while the country was a popular exhibit destination for cars made in Europe.

Leave a reply This entry was posted in About the Trout, Events, Global Public Transit and tagged buses, public transit on March 6, 2013 by john. Edit

International Public Transit: Public hearing held on transportation rate increase

YORK – Slight increases will likely take place regarding York County Public Transportation System.

Right now, it costs $2 for an out-of-city ride on the county’s bus. If the commissioners move forward with the change, the rate will increase to $4.

Also, it costs $10 for out-of-county round trips on the county bus. It’s proposed that this particular rate should change to $12.

A public hearing on the matter was held Tuesday morning, with no one speaking against the rate increases. Continue reading →

Leave a reply This entry was posted in About the Trout, Blog, Events, International Public Transit and tagged aging, fares, Handibus, public trasporation on March 6, 2013 by john. Edit

National Public Transit: Subway line for Broadway corridor is best public transit option to relieve gridlock, UBC study says

TransLink has cited a $3-billion subway line along the Broadway corridor as having the “highest acceptability rating” among three potential rapid-transit options.

But the transportation authority noted light rail transit or a partly tunnelled LRT – ranging from $1.1 billion to $1.84 billion – along with a $2.67-billion combination of subway and LRT are also “more acceptable than business as usual” on the heavily congested corridor.

Bus or bus rapid transit along the route, meanwhile, has not been recommended for further consideration because “they do not have sufficient capacity to meet demand in 2041,” according to a University of B.C. rapid-transit analysis. Continue reading →

Leave a reply This entry was posted in About the Trout, Events, National Public Transit and tagged BC, public transit, subways on March 6, 2013 by john. Edit

Media archives

International Transit: FTA and FEMA agree roles for addressing public transit needs in future major disasters

The US Federal Transit Administration (FTA) and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) have signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) that outlines the roles and responsibilities of both agencies in providing federal assistance to repair and restore public transportation systems in areas the President has declared a major disaster or emergency. FTA’s newly authorized Public Transportation Emergency Relief Program was established by the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21) and the MOA is required to establish the relief program

. “After disasters hit, our federal, state and local partners must be able to move quickly and make the necessary repairs to our nation’s transit systems, roads, rails and bridges,” said US Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. “Today’s announcement makes it easier for them to get to work, and DOT will continue to work closely with FEMA and our partners to ensure that emergency relief funds are available as quickly as possible to rebuild from Hurricane Sandy.”

The MOA is a key requirement that must be in place before the bulk of the FTA’s disaster relief funds for Hurricane Sandy aid can be released, as prescribed by the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 for the victims of Hurricane Sandy. Continue reading →

Leave a reply This entry was posted in About the Trout, Blog, Events, International Public Transit and tagged disater, FEMA, FTA, government, International Public Transit, policy, public transit on March 6, 2013 by john. Edit

Cash for rural transit may be en route

http://catchthetrout.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/TROUTOct2012-003.jpghttp://catchthetrout.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/TROUTOct2012-003.jpg‘Communities can’t wait another year,’ Hendsbee says

Those living without a car on the outskirts of Halifax Regional Municipality usually have to rely on their feet, a bicycle or the kindness of friends and strangers to get around.

And with the suggestion of an urban transit boundary in the regional plan, it is unlikely bus routes will pull into those rural communities any time soon.

Instead, Metro Transit has suggested rural communities come up with their own transit solutions, something the municipality may help pay for if council approves the funding scheme that went before the grants committee Monday. Continue reading →

Leave a reply This entry was posted in About the Trout, Blog, Events and tagged news, public transit, rural transit, transportation on March 5, 2013 by john. Edit

Our Economy Needs Public Transit To Tackle Gridlock

Ontario has followed the same basic transportation strategy for decades. We build more roads, traffic congestion increases. The result? Longer commutes. Less farmland. Frustrating traffic jams. Soaring asthma rates.

Clearly, the status quo isn’t working. Ontario needs change. Gridlock costs $6 billion per year in the GTHA alone. If we continue with the status quo, congestion will cost $15 billion per year by 2031. There are clear economic costs when we can’t move goods and people efficiently. There’s also a cost to our families and communities when we spend more time in the car than at home.

We need a strategy that will take Ontario’s economy out of gridlock and into the fast lane. Continue reading →

Leave a reply This entry was posted in About the Trout, Blog, Events and tagged gridlock, ontario, public transit on March 4, 2013 by john. Edit

McCallion blames poor planning for transit woes

Hazel McCallion.

Mayor Hazel McCallion told last night’s meeting of the Toronto Region Board of Trade thattransportation issues have caused a crisis across the GTA.

The mayor cited poor planning, communication and arrogance on the part of the provincial government, City of Toronto officials and other members of government, including herself, who neglected to make transportation the focus of land use.
“It’s not been the basis of land use planning and that’s why we’re in the mess that we’re in,” said McCallion at the meeting, billed as a “fireside chat” by its sponsor, the Urban Land Institute’s Toronto chapter.

“One of the greatest things that we did not do well, and all municipalities are guilty of this, was that transportation should have been the basis of all decisions back then. When we look at the GTA, we say ‘why are we in this problem?’ Transportation is one of the things that should be a land use decision, but it’s never been that way and it still isn’t. Continue reading →

Leave a reply This entry was posted in About the Trout, Blog, Events and tagged congestion, Hazel McCallion, public transit, transportation on March 1, 2013 by john. Edit

Public transit safest mode of transportation, study says

Vancouver – If you wanna be safe, take the bus – and leave the motorbike on blocks.

That’s the conclusion from a new study on the relative safety of the car, bicycle, and motorcycle as opposed to walking and public transit.

Buses and public transit are the safest, while motorbikes are the most dangerous. Continue reading →

Leave a reply This entry was posted in About the Trout, Blog, Events and tagged canada, public transit, rural transit, safety on March 1, 2013 by john. Edit

Could Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne reboot a national transit strategy?

Ontario’s new premier is vowing to put transit planning back on the federal radar, a call to arms that could succeed where others have failed.

The Globe and Mail reports that freshly-crowned Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne met with Prime Minister Stephen Harper last week and spoke about the need for a national strategy to fund transit projects in Canada.

“Infrastructure is one of the issues that I’ve said very clearly that I’m going to be raising with the federal government – particularly infrastructure and transit funding. I think that it’s extremely important that those two go hand in hand,” Wynne told the Globe.

Wynne’s focus would certainly be Ontario systems, specifically the overburdened and aging Toronto transit grid, but it is a message that could help across the country.

The last formal bid to start a national public transit strategy came in 2011, when NDP MP Olivia Chow introduced Bill C-305, intent on tackling the fragmented transit planning approach.

The National Public Transit Strategy Act aimed to build a game plan to ensure fast, accessible transit across Canada.

The keys were to reduce commute times, alleviate congestion and establish a permanent funding system, rather than one-off funding promises issued piecemeal. It was officially rejected in 2012, as the Conservative government elected to maintain the status quo.

Canada is also the only G8 nation without a national transit strategy. This says something about how serious other nations are taking the issue, or perhaps how much we are not.

The University of Toronto’s School of Public Policy and Governance considered the proper role of the federal government in a transit strategy, and suggested the current funding arrangements lacked transparency and actually “has a negative impact on public transit.”

It recommended a dedicated, long-term commitment that funds regions and projects based on a clear allocation formula.

So how would a national transit strategy actually work?

In the United States, 0.067 per cent of the GDP goes toward transit through the Safe Accountable Flexible Efficient Transportation Equity Act (SAFETEA).

SAFETEA was signed into law in 2005, guaranteeing $244.1 billion in funding for highways and public transportation systems. The one-stop shop for transit funding streamlines construction and safety improvements, allows states to react quickly to issues causing congestion and ensures each state receives an equitable share of funding.

So, you know, something like that would be a start.

Whatever the end result, it is progress that the issue is being discussed. The Canadian Urban Transit Association (CUTA) wrapped up a two-day conference today, focused on the economic benefits of investing in transit.

“It is important to put transit at the centre of communities across Canada and to keep transit at the forefront of urban development and growth” CUTA President Michael Roschlau said. “These meetings are an opportunity to reinforce that message with government and industry stakeholders.”

Yes. More talking, please. Maybe something will be said that spurs action.

Author: Mathew Coutts

Source: YahooNews

Leave a reply This entry was posted in About the Trout, Blog, Events on February 27, 2013 by john. Edit

A day in the life of Canberra’s bus network

Cash for rural transit may be en route

TROUT‘Communities can’t wait another year,’ Hendsbee says   

Those living without a car on the outskirts of Halifax Regional Municipality usually have to rely on their feet, a bicycle or the kindness of friends and strangers to get around.

And with the suggestion of an urban transit boundary in the regional plan, it is unlikely bus routes will pull into those rural communities any time soon.

Instead, Metro Transit has suggested rural communities come up with their own transit solutions, something the municipality may help pay for if council approves the funding scheme that went before the grants committee Monday. Continue reading →


 


Our Economy Needs Public Transit To Tackle Gridlock

Ontario has followed the same basic transportation strategy for decades. We build more roads, traffic congestion increases. The result? Longer commutes. Less farmland. Frustrating traffic jams. Soaring asthma rates.

Clearly, the status quo isn’t working. Ontario needs change. Gridlock costs $6 billion per year in the GTHA alone. If we continue with the status quo, congestion will cost $15 billion per year by 2031. There are clear economic costs when we can’t move goods and people efficiently. There’s also a cost to our families and communities when we spend more time in the car than at home.

We need a strategy that will take Ontario’s economy out of gridlock and into the fast lane. Continue reading →



A bigger tax break for those who take public transit

About 2.7 million families will benefit from the tax break for taking mass transit. Bebeto Matthews / AP

Transit riders will get a bigger tax break this year, thanks to a provision tucked into the legislation that averted a fall off the fiscal cliff.

As part of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2013, Congress decided that for 2013 people who take mass transit to work will get the same pretax benefits as those who drive and pay to park their car. Both can set aside up to $245 a month to cover these expenses, if their employer offers such a plan.

That’s a big change from last year, when employees could set aside up to $240 a month to park, but only $125 a month for transit expenses. In 2011, the tax savings had been the same for parking or public transportation.

Now parity is back and that could mean more savings for transit commuters.

“Someone in the highest federal tax bracket – 30 to 39.6 percent – could save about $570 a year. Someone in the 15 percent tax bracket could save about $260 a year,” explained Lisa Greene-Lewis, lead CPA at the American Tax and Financial Center at TurboTax.

According to Bloomberg News, about 2.7 million families will benefit from this tax break.

“It’s not so much the dollar value; it’s the parity,” said Jon Martz, a vice president at vRide, which provides vanpool services in about 60 different urban areas in the country. “Why give people an incentive to commute in single occupancy cars? Give them a benefit of equal value for choosing to take public transportation, if they can do it.”

And there’s more good news. Congress made the change retroactive. It’s as if the higher limit of $240 had been in effect for transit riders all last year. The IRS already gave employers guidance on how to put that money back into their employees’ paychecks.

If you used this program last year and didn’t see an adjustment in your paycheck to cover the reimbursement, talk to your employer. If you haven’t been told about the higher limits for 2013 and want to put more aside, contact human resources.

Moving forward

The fiscal cliff deal only guaranteed an equal tax break for commuters who drive and those who take public transit for 2013. Those who support public transportation want this provision to be permanent.

“We need Congress to act to finally make the transit and the parking benefits equal so that all commuters are on a level playing field,” said Steven Higashide, a senior planner at the Tri-State Transportation Campaign, a non-profit watchdog group that serves New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. “This will create an incentive for transit riders and take more cars off the road.”

Frank Linkchorst, an aerospace engineer in California, agrees. He rides a vanpool weekdays from his home in El Segundo to work in Los Angeles 38 miles away. It’s cheaper and faster than being in a car.

“Anything that encourages people to rideshare is helpful,” he told me. “With 10 of us in that van, that’s nine fewer cars on the road at any given time – and that helps everybody.”

More Information:

Authour: Herb Weisbaum is The ConsumerMan. Follow him on Facebookand Twitter or visit The ConsumerMan website.

Source: LifeInc



McCallion blames poor planning for transit woes

 

Hazel McCallion.

Mayor Hazel McCallion told last night’s meeting of the Toronto Region Board of Trade thattransportation issues have caused a crisis across the GTA.

The mayor cited poor planning, communication and arrogance on the part of the provincial government, City of Toronto officials and other members of government, including herself, who neglected to make transportation the focus of land use. “It’s not been the basis of land use planning and that’s why we’re in the mess that we’re in,” said McCallion at the meeting, billed as a “fireside chat” by its sponsor, the Urban Land Institute’s Toronto chapter.

“One of the greatest things that we did not do well, and all municipalities are guilty of this, was that transportation should have been the basis of all decisions back then. When we look at the GTA, we say ‘why are we in this problem?’ Transportation is one of the things that should be a land use decision, but it’s never been that way and it still isn’t. Continue reading →



Public transit safest mode of transportation, study says

Vancouver – If you wanna be safe, take the bus – and leave the motorbike on blocks.

That’s the conclusion from a new study on the relative safety of the car, bicycle, and motorcycle as opposed to walking and public transit.

Buses and public transit are the safest, while motorbikes are the most dangerous. Continue reading →



Could Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne reboot a national transit strategy?

Ontario’s new premier is vowing to put transit planning back on the federal radar, a call to arms that could succeed where others have failed.

The Globe and Mail reports that freshly-crowned Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne met with Prime Minister Stephen Harper last week and spoke about the need for a national strategy to fund transit projects in Canada.

“Infrastructure is one of the issues that I’ve said very clearly that I’m going to be raising with the federal government – particularly infrastructure and transit funding. I think that it’s extremely important that those two go hand in hand,” Wynne told the Globe.

Wynne’s focus would certainly be Ontario systems, specifically the overburdened and aging Toronto transit grid, but it is a message that could help across the country.

The last formal bid to start a national public transit strategy came in 2011, when NDP MP Olivia Chow introduced Bill C-305, intent on tackling the fragmented transit planning approach.

The National Public Transit Strategy Act aimed to build a game plan to ensure fast, accessible transit across Canada.

The keys were to reduce commute times, alleviate congestion and establish a permanent funding system, rather than one-off funding promises issued piecemeal. It was officially rejected in 2012, as the Conservative government elected to maintain the status quo.

Canada is also the only G8 nation without a national transit strategy. This says something about how serious other nations are taking the issue, or perhaps how much we are not.

The University of Toronto’s School of Public Policy and Governance considered the proper role of the federal government in a transit strategy, and suggested the current funding arrangements lacked transparency and actually “has a negative impact on public transit.”

It recommended a dedicated, long-term commitment that funds regions and projects based on a clear allocation formula.

So how would a national transit strategy actually work?

In the United States, 0.067 per cent of the GDP goes toward transit through the Safe Accountable Flexible Efficient Transportation Equity Act (SAFETEA).

SAFETEA was signed into law in 2005, guaranteeing $244.1 billion in funding for highways and public transportation systems. The one-stop shop for transit funding streamlines construction and safety improvements, allows states to react quickly to issues causing congestion and ensures each state receives an equitable share of funding.

So, you know, something like that would be a start.

Whatever the end result, it is progress that the issue is being discussed. The Canadian Urban Transit Association (CUTA) wrapped up a two-day conference today, focused on the economic benefits of investing in transit.

“It is important to put transit at the centre of communities across Canada and to keep transit at the forefront of urban development and growth” CUTA President Michael Roschlau said. “These meetings are an opportunity to reinforce that message with government and industry stakeholders.”

Yes. More talking, please. Maybe something will be said that spurs action.

Author: Mathew Coutts

Source: YahooNews



Events

TROUT is pleased to offer Charter Service and promotional support to the Southern Ontario Ice Climbing Festival! Check out www.SOIceFest.com for more details!

We are appreciative of the support of organizations such as SOIceFest who understand the value of public transportation systems, and are excited to host a film crew on the TROUT public transit in town service on Friday February 26th, 2016!

SOIceFest poster BANCROFT - Small

 

TROUT Public Transit looks back at 2013 with mixed feelings

TROUT Rural Public TransitWe at TROUT Public Transit look back on 2013 with mixed feelings. We are thankful for the visionaries who support public transportation in our community – the municipal politicians, business owners, and others who know the value of public transportation for our non-driving friends and neighbours and for economic growth. They know that public transportation is a key component of sustainability for rural communities.

We are proud that rural communities throughout North America look to Trout Public Transit for counsel and inspiration for their public transportation initiatives. And we are deeply grateful to the Province of Ontario and Community Care North Hastings for their support and encouragement.

However, we have much work to do. We receive no support from the County of Hastings (future historians may be curious about that) and no support, or only token support, from seven of the eight municipalities we served last year.

Thank you to the Municipality of Highlands East in Haliburton County for your full support in 2013. We look forward to nurturing our relationship with you to address your public transportation needs.

Looking ahead, TROUT Public Transit remains committed to helping people in North Hastings and Highlands East access the goods and services they need to live with independence and dignity in our community.

Also, we will be seeking expanded support from local municipalities and the business community for the economic growth and development potential that a public transportation service offers. The extent of that support will dictate our direction in 2014 and beyond.

John Keith,  MA

Manager, Transportation Services

 

Rural Ontario Municipalities Curious About Public Transportation

rural public transitSomebody out there sees the value of public transportation service in rural Ontario communities. And that’s encouraging.

Rural municipalities are beginning to see that public transportation boosts local economies by connecting people to goods, services, and jobs, with a benefit-to-cost ratio of more than 3 to 1 for rural communities not uncommon.

They’re noting that public transportation is of vital importance for attracting prospective new residents – ranked second, right behind adequate healthcare.

And, they are becoming more sensitive to the requirements of their non-driving ratepayers. Public transportation fosters independence and dignity, and it enriches quality of life by providing social and cultural opportunities otherwise restricted to some of their friends and neighbours.

I’ve been invited by the Ministry of Municipal Affairs to conduct a presentation on rural public transportation at the Ontario East Municipal Conference in Kingston on Thursday, September 12.

It will be interesting to see how many folks pop in for the hour-long session and what their backgrounds and interests are.

As a former educator, I cannot help but inject an interactive component into the get together to TROUT PASSENGERS 001bring out some ideas and perceptions about providing public transportation for an increasing number of non-drivers in rural Ontario communities.

We will discuss benefits of rural public transportation.  We’ll identify barriers, with cost right up there at the top of the list, I expect.  And we’ll look at ways to address barriers.

I will also provide participants with a brief overview of the TROUT Transit operation, and offer some insights based on research and my experiences as manager of a rural public transportation service.

TROUT Public Transit is in its fourth year of operation serving seven municipalities in rural Hastings County and one municipality in the County of Haliburton. Ridership increased 24% in the last fiscal year, and the need for public transportation in our communities continues to rise.

Hats off to rural Ontario municipalities for their curiosity about public transportation. It’s the first step toward evolving local transportation infrastructures to meet the needs of increasing numbers of non-driving ratepayers,  grow local economies, and contribute to a sustainable future.

Trout Rural Public Transit  005

Gas Tax Fuels Transit Improvements

News Release

July 8, 2013

Ontario Government Strengthens Commitment to Public Transit

Ontario is providing $324 million in gas tax funding to 96 municipal transit systems this year.

The funding will help municipalities expand and improve public transit infrastructure, increase accessibility, buy more conventional and specialized transit vehicles, add more routes and extend hours of service.

This year, the Ontario government made its Gas Tax Program permanent to help municipalities improve public transit, ease traffic congestion and reduce air pollution. The change was made as part of the 2013 Budget to provide stability for municipalities and help them plan.

Investing in public transit is part of the Ontario government’s plan to help reduce congestion, strengthen the economy and build a fair and prosperous society.

 

QUICK FACTS

  • Ontario shares two cents per litre of provincial gas tax revenues with municipalities to expand and improve their public transit systems.
  • With this year’s allocation, the Ontario government has committed more than $2.6 billion in gas tax funding since 2004.
  • One bus takes up to 40 vehicles off the road, and keeps 25 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions out of the atmosphere each year.
  • In 2011, public transit ridership in Ontario increased by nearly 171 million passenger trips compared to 2003. This is the equivalent of removing approximately 143 million car trips off the province’s roads.

 

LEARN MORE

 

QUOTES

“The new Ontario government’s permanent, dedicated Gas Tax Program provides sustainable transit funding municipalities can count on to improve transit services across the province. Our transit investments help build better communities, support our economy, protect our environment and improve overall quality of life for Ontarians.”
— Glen Murray, Minister of Infrastructure, Minister of Transportation

 

CONTACTS

Ajay Woozageer
Communications Branch
416-327-1158

Bob Nichols
Communications Branch
416-327-1158
Bob.Nichols@ontario.ca

Patrick Searle
Minister’s Office
416-327-1815
patrick.searle@ontario.ca

Ministry of Transportation
http://www.ontario.ca/transportation