Public Transit Information


TTROUTOct2012 015he Rural Overland Utility Transit (TROUT)
 is an organization dedicated to providing industry executives, academia and clients with  market intelligence, and news and media highlights for rural public transit. TROUT is committed to providing industry executives and clients with an organized voice on issues and events of importance in this growing sector.

 

Library

The Library includes white papers and published reports on rural public transit.

At Trout we aim to stay a head of the curve and by helping others as we pioneer our way building our own rural public transit system. We are collecting and building this library of resources for us and you to learn from best practices as well as share our own.

Report to Municipalities Fall 2012
For The Rural and Overland Utility Transit Report to Municipalities click here

Economic Benefit of TROUT
(January 24, 2014)
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Summary: This summary outlines how the TROUT can be an economically beneficial long-term investment for the region. A public transit system that integrates the needs of the local communities through an innovative approach of mixed service modes would help with overall community mobility. This could well lead to a diversification of intra-communal spending as the TROUT could expose people to new businesses and opportunities. Mobility of capital in the region thus far is largely dependent on individual transportation methods. Private transportation is a means many people utilize to do a lot of their commercial activity outside our immediate region, hurting the local economy. A public transit system that provides both individualized pick-up and a regularly scheduled route can be an asset to allow people to cheaply traverse surrounding townships and engage with the local economy. As a whole, it is deemed that “improvements in transport services will lead to increased mobility, which [has] a positive impact on the social and economic development of a particular region by encouraging the relocation of people and additional small enterprises,” a goal that all small townships should strive for.
Keywords: public transportation, rural public transit
Categories: About the Trout, Blog, Home, Provincial Public Transit
Planning for Transportation in Rural Areas
(September 17, 2013)
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Summary: The purpose of this document, Planning for Transportation in Rural Areas, is to provide a resource to rural planners, city and county engineers, stakeholders, local officials, and other decision-makers involved with developing rural transportation plans. Rather than attempting to make this document a definitive step-by-step guide to rural transportation planning, it is intended to be a useful resource to those involved with rural planning.
Keywords: rural public transit, transportation, white paper
Categories: About the Trout, Blog, International Public Transit
RURAL TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS AND POLICIES CONCEPTS FOR HALIBURTON COUNTY
(September 17, 2013)
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Summary: ABSTRACT: This paper outlines different models used to provide public transportation in rural areas including carsharing, ridesharing, bus transit, and vanpooling. This paper provides examples of policies used by agencies, businesses and governments pertaining to rural transportation. This paper concludes with recommendations for how to improve and provide rural transportation options in Haliburton County, Ontario
Keywords: bus transit, carsharing, rural public transit, transportation
Categories: About the Trout, Blog
Next Stop Health: Transit Access and Health Inequities in Toronto
(April 19, 2013)
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Summary: Access to public transit contributes to the health of individuals, neighbourhoods, and to the city overall. The importance of public transit in Toronto is evident in residents’ high usage rates to commute to work compared to other Canadian cities. This is particularly true for lower income commuters who are more dependent on public transit to get to work than their higher income counterparts. Despite greater reliance on public transit, its cost remains a problem for low income Toronto residents, particularly for those on social assistance. As well, the availability of transit has an impact on low income residents' ability to access important goods and services such as food, health care, employment, and recreation, all of which impact their health.
Keywords: health, low income, public transit, U of T
Categories: About the Trout, Blog, Home, National Public Transit
It’s my choice: Safer mobility for an ageing population
(March 5, 2013)
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Summary: The ageing population is a phenomenon often referred to in the media and even in everyday conversation. We talk about its effects on public finances, on housing and on employment. Within transport, we hear stories of older drivers causing crashes or getting lost on the motorway. The context of an ageing population should be applied to the whole of the transport sector. To take it further, we can begin to consider what the ageing population will do to transport and what the transport sector can do for the ageing population. This report begins to consider the social role of transport, where getting safely from A to B is only part of the story. Transport can alleviate or aggravate inequalities. It can make a significant difference to quality of life and well-being. It has a part to play in creating active citizens who continue to contribute to society.
Keywords: aging population, public transit, rural public transit, transportation
Categories: Blog, Media Archives
NATIONAL TRANSIT STRATEGY & POLICY
Joshua Hjartarson, Kelly Hinton, Matthew Mendelsohn(February 27, 2013)
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Keywords: canada, policy, public transit
Categories: Blog
The Private Sector and Public Transit Service in Canada
Transport Canada(February 15, 2013)
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Summary: Overview The private sector has been actively involved in Canadian public transit systems since the industry’s early days, when privately owned streetcar operators were the norm. But by the mid-twentieth century, the dawning of the automobile age had weakened transit markets and transit operations gradually became a public-sector enterprise.
Keywords: private transit, public transit
Categories: About the Trout, Blog
Marketing and Branding for Bus Rapid Transit
Transport Canada(February 15, 2013)
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Summary: Overview More and more transit agencies are using more sophisticated, contemporary commercial marketing approaches and methods to both attract new users and to retain existing riders. Some of the methods include sophisticated market research and segmentation tactics, branding and identity programs, product positions, and individualized and targeted marketing. The use of these approaches has primarily involved newer express and rapid bus services in cities across Canada and the US. From unique branding that visually distinguishes the buses, stops and stations from the “regular” transit services provided by the parent agency, to targeted marketing strategies designed to position the services as “premium” transportation options, the new approaches collectively help create a positive brand awareness amongst the general public and have attracted new riders to the services.
Keywords: brand awarness, branding, public transit, riders, rural public transit, transit
Categories: About the Trout, Blog
Public Transit - Early Transit Phase-In Policy: Promoting Transit in Growing Communities
Transport Canada(February 15, 2013)
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Summary: Overview Large cities typically experience the challenge that faced Brampton in the mid-1990s. As subdivisions grow, transit services are not implemented fast enough to give new residents the choice of using transit. Instead, many people opt to purchase a second vehicle and get in the habit of driving. Brampton took a proactive approach by introducing transit routes to new subdivisions as early as possible.
Keywords: ontario, public transit, transporation
Categories: About the Trout, Blog
Charlottetown Transit
Transport Canada(February 13, 2013)
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Summary: Overview In 2005, the City of Charlottetown partnered with a private bus operator to manage and run a small, local transit system. The system serves Charlottetown’s 32,000 residents on five routes six days a week. In a departure from more conventional transit systems, Charlottetown Transit uses heritage style diesel trolley buses that are considered more in keeping with the City’s heritage values. As a public-private partnership, the system operator keeps the $2 transit fares and receives support from the City of Charlottetown in the form of an annual operating subsidy that is set up on a declining scale. The current subsidy is worth over $600,000, but will decline to $375,000 at the end of the five-year contract term at which point it is anticipated that the service will have grown to seven routes and an annual ridership of 250,000. The operator, Trius Tours, is fully responsible for all management of the system, including marketing, operations and all system maintenance. In 2006, Charlottetown’s transit services represented just over 1.5% of the City’s $37 million operating budget.
Keywords: Charlottetown, public transit, rural public transit
Categories: Blog